Archive for April, 2013

Driving Tour to Historic Fort Simcoe State Park Heritage Site

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

This driving tour takes you to the historic Fort Simcoe State Park Heritage Site on the Yakama Nation Reservation, past abundant agriculture area with  fruit and produce stands, the museum at the Yakama Cultural Center, and through the City of Toppenish, known for over 70 western themed murals. This is a good trip to take a picnic lunch, there are picnic tables and grills, as well as a covered picnic shelter, and don’t forget your camera. Fort Simcoe was built in 1856 as housing for US Army troops sent to the area to watch over the local Yakama Nation. This weekend, May 4 & 5 2013, Fort Simcoe State Park will be the site of a Civil War Reenactment. For a schedule of events click here. This drive tour takes approximately 1 hour to reach Fort Simcoe, and about 84.5 miles round trip. Enjoy hundreds of acres of orchards, vineyards, and produce farms. During the harvest season, farms and orchards feature fresh produce stands offering wide variety of fresh fruits and produce in season. Map.

Starting point is the Yakima Valley Visitor Information Center, Exit 33A I-82E. Turn Left out of parking lot, proceed under the freeway bridge, take first left onto I-82 East to Exit 37  to Highway 97.  Once past Union Gap, WA, you are on the Yakama Nation Reservation.  There is a pull off to the right with a historic marker (mile 6.2) denoting the spot of a battle between Army troops and the Yakama’s during the “war” of 1855. Leaving this historical marker,  take “Lateral A” next road off to the right, towards White Swan, WA. (Alternative driving route –continue on Hwy 97 to Fort Road. This route takes you past the Yakama Cultural Heritage Center,  turn left onto Fort Road, going past the Legends Casino to Fort Simcoe, follow signs. Or turn right to enter the city of Toppenish to view the western themed murals and museums.)

The Yakima Valley is known as an abundant agricultural area, you will see this on Lateral A.  There are farm fresh fruit and produce stands and row crops of vegetables, such as asparagus   hot peppers, tomatoes, squash, corn, watermelon, and other produce. Off of Lateral A you will pass Dagdagen Farm & Produce and Imperial Garden’s. Close by on Wapato Road are Blue BerryHill Berries, and on Evans Road is Holy Cow Grass Fed Beef. Continue on Lateral A to the junction with Branch Road (mile 14.3) and turn right, past orchards, row crops, vineyards, cattle ranches, hop and mint fields. The Yakima Valley produces most of the mint, sweet cherries, concord grapes and hops sold in the USA.(Alternate route continue on Lateral A to Fort Road, turn right, follow signs at White Swan take Signal Peak Road to Fort Simcoe Road, turn right to Fort Simcoe.)

As you turn onto Branch Road, note Mt. Adams in the distance directly ahead. This mountain dominates the lower valley, “Phato” to people of the Yakama Nation, the mountain figures prominently in the history and legends of the Yakama people. Continue west on Branch Road, you will come to Harrah (mile 17.4). a reservation town established in 1913 under the name Saluskin in honor of Chief Saluskin of the Yakama Nation.  Julius T. Harrah of Philadelphia had much to do with the development of the area in the field of agriculture and business. He built a home here and platted the town and used his influence to change the name of the town to Harrah.  Staying on Branch Road, the next town you encounter is Brownstown (mile 20.3). Brownstown, a shallow lake area at one time, was originally called Bench because of the location on a two-mile wide plateau. Named for Reese Brown, who had big hopes for its future, planning to build a thriving empire around Brownstown. Traveling  west, stay to the left onto the White Swan Road. (Alternative  route at the Y stay right on Branch Road, turn left on Westley, right on Medicine Valley Road, left on Hawk road and right on Fort Road to Fort Simcoe. The advantage is smoother roads.)   White Swan was a busy place at one time, with a bank, hotel, and many other businesses. The town was named for the Native American Tribal Chief who served for over 60 years, on whose lands it stands.  The town was platted but never incorporated.   In 1922, Toppenish wooed the Native American Agency headquarters away from nearby Fort Simcoe, taking most of the attendant population and business with it. You are now about 7.5 miles from the Fort. At the stop sign (mile 27.5) in White Swan, take a right to State Highway 220 and go west.

Fort Simcoe – (mile 35.1). This site was long used as a camping area for the tribes of the Yakama Nation. The cold springs called “Mool Mool” (bubbling water) by the Indians, offered an abundance of water in the otherwise dry region. Timber was nearby, and grassland was readily available. The weather in the valley here was normally better than further north. Simcoe is derived from the Yakama, “Sim-Ku-ee”, or SimKwee, the name for a dip in the ridge about three miles northeast of the fort. Sim refers to the female wrist, Ku-ee, or Kwee, means spine or back.

Pioneers first began to settle on the east side of the mountains from 1856 to 1859. Fort Simcoe served as a base for military expeditions in the Washington Territory. A change in military command in 1858 resulted in a proposal to abandon Fort Simcoe. In 1859, the site became the  Bureau of Indian Affairs Agency Headquarters, providing services to Native Americans living on the Reservation. Reading and writing were taught at the post as well as trade skills like carpentry, blacksmithing, and farming. The school lasted until the early 1900’s.

Fort Simcoe State Park: Recognizing  the historic significance of the site, Fort Simcoe was established as a State Park in 1953 with the assistance of the Fort Simcoe and Mool Mool Restoration Society. Under a 99-year lease from the Yakama Nation, the 200-acre park is administered by the State Parks and Recreation Commission.  The park offers picnic facilities, restrooms, tables, picnic shelter, and running water in a grassy portion of the large oak grove adjoining the parking area. The Interpretative Center in the park depicts the history of the site through displays, artifacts, and photographs. Open from April 1 to September 30 daily from 6:30 a.m.to dusk and from October 1 to March 31 on weekends and holidays only.  Search for the old blockhouse, in the spring enjoy  the wildflowers and  hunt for Lewis’s woodpecker among the oaks.

Return toward White Swan via Highway 220. Once in White Swan, take a right on Curtis Street (mile 42.8) heading toward Toppenish on Fort Road. Continue on Fort Road you will pass Legends Casino, Operated by the Yakama Nation offering wonderful buffet dining daily. Nearby on Fort Road is the entrance to the Yakama Nation Cultural Center (mile 61.3).

Yakama Nation Cultural Heritage Center – (mile 61.7).  This fairly new facility is located on the ancestral ground of the Yakama Nation. The Yakamas have lived in harmony with these lands for thousands of years. They share their heritage with all visitors at the Cultural Center. The Center offers a gift shop featuring authentic Yakama beadwork, a restaurant with Native American atmosphere and menu; museum with great dioramas and exhibits; theatre providing first run movies for the area; Winterlodge for banquets, dances, and conventions; and library, full-service with an emphasis on Native American culture.

Return to Fort Road, turn left to downtown Toppenish.

Toppenish – (mile 63.6) – The town derives its name from the native word “gapuishlema” meaning “people from the foot of the hills”. The name has also been generally interpreted to mean “sloping downward and spreading”. In that sense, it describes the easterly slope of the lands from the mountain until spreading flatly to form the basin of the Valley. When the Northern Pacific railroad spanned the Valley, it erected a section house, telegraph office, and water tank here in 1883 to serve as a maintenance center, and they named it Toppenish.

The city’s motto is “City Where the West Still Lives”, and is known as the City of Murals. Murals are bigger than life, depicting the lives and times of Toppenish’s early days. This results from the successful efforts of the Toppenish Mural Society (TMS), a group of local citizens interested in preserving the culture and history of the town. The Society’s insistence on high standards for quality of art and historical accuracy has made the murals a must-see for Valley visitors and has garnered national publicity for the town. You’ll find a map of the city and key to mural locations at the Toppenish Mural Office along with the original artist work submitted for approval for each mural.

Northern Pacific Railway Museum: The Toppenish Railroad Depot was built by the Northern Pacific Railway in 1911.  The museum features RR artifacts.  Open May through October: Tuesday to Saturday, 10AM to 4 PM, Sunday  Noon to 4 PM, closed Monday.  Winter hours November through April by special arrangement and see schedule for special events.    All operations are now at the depot with caboose rides offered with special events.

American Hop Museum: The American Hop Museum, located in the heart of the nation’s largest hop producing area, features exhibits and artifacts depicting Hop growing, harvesting, and history.  Open: May 1st. through September 30th.Wednesday thru Saturday 10am.-4pm.Sunday 11am.-4pm. Offering pre-scheduled tours year round. American Hop Museum History of Hops video.

After viewing the Toppenish Murals and museums,  return to Highway 97 to Yakima. On your way back, you will pass the town of Wapato.  When the Northern Pacific railroad first came through here, it was called Simcoe Siding. Later, when Alex McCready became active in the community, residents decided they wanted a post office.  But, the petition was refused because there was already a post office at Fort Simcoe and the two names would be too confusing. Mrs. McCready and her friends got together and decided on the name Wapato, from a variation of the word meaning potato in the Chinook language.  The post office was granted under the new name around the year 1902 and Mrs. McCready became the postmistress.

About halfway between Wapato and Union Gap, you will pass through the town of Parker, established around 1915. Another community of the same name was built earlier across the Yakima River (reached by driving east from Parker, and over the Parker Bridge; an alternate route to the Treveri Cellars Winery and the Yakima Valley Highway). The earlier community was the first semblance of a town in the valley area outside of the Fort Simcoe development and was called Konnewock by the Indians. It is today known as Parker Bottom.

Take the I-82 exit from 97 to bring you back to Exit 33 to Yakima Avenue and Downtown Yakima.  (Alternative route, take the Union Gap exit off of Highway 97 and sample the produce stands, eateries, and shopping opportunities at the Valley Mall in Union Gap. Driving north, Union Gaps main Street changes name to South 1st Street – the main North/South Street for the area. To reach Downtown Yakima, stay on 1st Street to Yakima Avenue, running east and west.)

The Yakima Valley blog articles feature members of the Yakima Valley Visitors and Convention Bureau. If you would like to receive information regarding membership, Click here, or to request a membership application, please contact Michelle Hopkins at (509) 575-3010.

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Spring Barrel at a Glance: Lunch, Live Music & Special Events

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

Spring Barrel 2013, April 26-28, in the Yakima Valley.  Come, taste new releases from the barrel and enjoy an educational experience with winemakers, plus discounts on wine.  Spring Barrel is all about the wine and most wineries offer a bit of food paired with the new wines, if you would like a meal, the wineries listed below will have food available for purchase. You will need to bring your own wineglass or purchase one at a winery or the Yakima Valley Visitor Information Center.  Sit and listen to live music while you enjoy your lunch. The list below includes the wineries offering live music during Spring Barrel weekend. For a comprehensive list of all the wines offered by the wineries and their wine and food pairings, check the Wineries of Yakima (WAY), Rattlesnake Hills Wine TrailWine Yakima ValleyVisit Yakima Valley websites. 

Spring Barrel Tasting Wine And Dine: New this year for Wine Yakima Valley Premier Pass holders:  Local restaurants will feature a Wine & Dine special in celebration of Spring Barrel Tasting weekend.  Beginning April 24 – April 28, participating restaurants will offer a food and wine combination featuring local Yakima Valley wine. Premier Pass holders can bring their Pass to any of the participating restaurants for validation and receive a limited edition 30th anniversary logo glass with each meal purchased.

Winery Association of Yakima (WAY)/Downtown Yakima

  • AntoLin Cellars: In the Production Facility at 10 North 6th Ave: Live music by “Rondi Marsh and the Jazz Crush Combo”, Friday April 26th from 6:30pm-8:30pm. Barrel tasting at 6th Ave location only.
  • Antolin Cellars/Lookout Point Tasting Room: 16 North 2nd St. Delicious small plates for purchase to pair with excellent wines.
  • Kana Winery: Outside BBQ Fri-Sat, serving Hog Wild BBQ from 1PM – 3PM. Acoustic music Fri-Sat 5PM-7PM.
  • Gilbert Cellars Tasting Room: 5 N Front Street in Historic Downtown Yakima.  Live music from Navid Eliot, 7-10p. No cover.
  • At the Cave: 2620 Draper Road in West Valley, Concert Saturday 1pm-4pm. Chad Bault, Navid Eliot, and Jennifer Borst of Not Amy.  Wine by the glass and light snacks will be available for purchase.
  • Naches Heights Vineyard: Friday, musician Adrienne Bosquet 7-9pm. Saturday, Jim Henson “The Muppet Man” 12-3pm, and Stimulus Package 4-7pm. BBQ food specials.
  • Treveri Sparkling Wines: Live music on Saturday. Friday reservation only Fondue Night Happy Hour 4.26.  Reservations 509-877-0925.  Saturday and Sunday, Derick from “Our Kitchen” catering  provides Asian Slaw Taco’s and several other homemade food items on premises.
  • Wilridge Vineyard: Live music Saturday by, These Guitars Say Sorry 1:00 to 4:00pm.

Rattlesnake Hills Wine Trail/Zillah Wineries. 

  • Agate Field Vineyard: Enjoy live music Sat & Sun afternoon with Alexius Harris.  Salsa Dogs for purchase.
  • Bonair Winery: Slava will be serenading Saturday with  Russian love songs and ballads. Miz Dee and her mouth-watering southern ribs, chicken and jambalaya will be serving up food on Saturday and Sunday.
  • Cultura Winery: Guerra’s Gourmet Saturday, April 27th, serving up their wine valley gourmet hot dog lunches on the patio on both Saturday 10 am-5 pm.
  • Horizon’s Edge: Come out and listen to some awesome music by our live band on Saturday April 27th from 12:30 – 4:00PM.
  • Hyatt VineyardFood and music on Saturday and Sunday - Rondi Marsh & Band.  Lutong Pinoy Bar BQ for purchase.
  • Knight Hill Winery: Live music by Hot BBQ Saturday at 1pm. Gourmet Hotdogs available for purchase on Saturday.
  • Silver Lake Winery: Live music both Saturday and Sunday along with local vendors for all your needs. Saturday- “The Village Musicians.” Sunday- Landon, from “The Village Musicians”.
  • Steppe Cellars: Wood-fired pizza on Saturday, April 27 – Snack plates available every day.  Enjoy a picnic, award winning wine and some great views of the valley.
  • Two Mountain Winery: Saturday, the 27th,  Tacos Urapan serving tacos for $1 a piece.
  • Wineglass Cellars: Hand-crafted wood items will be on display by artisan Marx Menzel.

Yakima Valley Community College/Grandview WA

  • Yakima Valley Vintners:  Student winemakers will be providing complimentary facility tours with educational stations featuring the difference decanting makes, food and wine pairings and a Carmenere barrel tasting.

Vintners Village/Prosser Food & Wine Park/Prosser, WA

  • Airfield Estates: Live performance by local musician Adrienne Bousquet. Treat yourself to a delicious lunch from Hogg Heaven BBQ.
  • Gamache Vintners: On Saturday- Ladies can shop for jewelry with Cookie Lee while the men check out what “Educated Cigar” has to offer!  Lunch on patio with Garcia’s famous Tex-Mex!
  • Desert Wind Winery: MOJAVE at Desert Wind will be open for lunch and dinner service Friday and Saturday, plus brunch and lunch service on Sunday. Friday evening at 6pm, will also offer popular Friday Night Supper Club, featuring a three-course dinner with wine pairing by Pontin del Roza.
  • Walter Clore Center UnWined – Tickets $15. Saturday April 27, 6-9pm, Live music by Ruben and Robbie on the Rocks. Enjoy selection of wine from: Hogue Cellars, Legends of Washington Wine exclusive red blends, Mercer Estate and Pontin Del Roza. Catering by Alexandria Nicole Cellars Executive Chef Frank Magana.
Red Mountain/Benton City
  • Sleeping Dog Wines: “Formally” releasing 2010 Montepulciano, to the best of our knowledge the only current bottling of this Italian varietal in Washington State – and pretty dog-gone tasty!  Samples of a Sleeping Dog Wines Merlot-infused dark chocolate.
  • Tapteil Vineyard Winery: Enjoy sampling gourmet, imported olive oils, balsamic vinegars and salts. Drink in the panoramic view of the Yakima Valley and Red Mountain AVA from our patio terrace.

The Yakima Valley blog articles feature members of the Yakima Valley Visitors and Convention Bureau. If you would like to receive information regarding membership, Click here, or to request a membership application, please contact Michelle Hopkins at (509) 575-3010.

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A Scenic Drive on the Road Less Traveled

Monday, April 15th, 2013

Travel scenic country roads on this circular route, from the beautiful manicured grounds of the Yakima Area Arboretum, through the hop fields of Moxee, over Konnowac Pass southwest through the Yakima Valley.  Scenic views of Yakima Valley fruit orchards, beautiful in the spring when the fruit trees are blossoming, the summer, when the foliage is a vibrant green and the fall, when the angle of the sun uniquely illuminates the leaves changing colors.  Discover four winery tasting rooms, two of which are in historic buildings

Starting at the Yakima Valley Visitor Information Center, turn left out of parking lot and access the I-82 East freeway. Continue to Exit 34 (Nob Hill Blvd). Turn left. (If you bicycling the Konnowac Pass, you may leave your vehicle at the Greenway parking lot at Sherman Park- this ride is about 27 miles. A moderate climb of more than two miles and a couple of short (1/4 mile) steep climbs to the top, down the other side, with the rest of the route being nearly level. Pavement quality is good and traffic generally light. Pleasant ride for Motorcyclists.) 

The Arboretum Road to the interpretive center of the Yakima Area Arboretum and Botanical Garden is on the left.  This 40-acre “tree museum” features self-guided tours, (map available), a Japanese Garden, gift shop, Jewett Pond Fountain and endless photo opportunities.
As you leave the Arboretum turn right at the light heading east on Highway 24 toward Moxee City. (Bicyclists-There is a well marked wide shoulder; traffic speed is 55mph, turn off is approximately 3.5 miles) Moxee is the Native American word for “whirlwinds”.  In the early 1880’s the Thorp Family settled in the Moxee Valley, later Alexander Graham Bell and his wife’s family invested in a large farming operation. The Moxee Land Company sold 20-acre lots in the 1890’s to recruit settlers. Hops were first grown here in 1877 and grew so well in this climate and soil that Moxee City, (1910) became the Hop Capitol of the world. Hundreds would camp and harvest the hops by hand, culminating in a “hop festival”.  Moxee still celebrates with the Moxee Hop Festival annually, 1st weekend in August. Today the hop harvest is largely mechanical. Large hop picking machines and drying kilns seen throughout the valley. Currently the Yakima Valley supplies over 75% of the Hops sold  in the United States.   At Birchfield Road to the left you will see Bale Breaker Brewing Company operated by Loftus Ranches Hop Growers. Open Wed. –Sat. (This scenic drive takes you back to this intersection with Birchfield Road)

Turn right on LaFramboise Road, left on Robillard Road and right on Konnowac Road.  Hop fields, recognizable by the tall poles used to support the vines, reach the tops of the poles in summer.  At the Konnowac Pass Y, stay right. Konnowac Pass was an old Native American trail connecting both ends of the Yakima Valley. Reaching the top of this small pass, you will see a patchwork of white and pink when the cherry and apple trees blossom in spring.
Parker Heights Road is down the pass on the right, just after a bend.  As you ride along this road surrounded by orchards, you will see Mt Adams and the distinctive old wooden Hop Kiln in the distance. Continue on Parker Heights until the bridge over the irrigation canal. For a closer look at the old hop kiln and to visit the winery with the hop kiln pictured on its label.  Turn left over the bridge to the Yakima Valley Highway, after a short ride you can turn right to visit Piety Flats Winery and Tasting Room. The tasting room, in the1911 Mercantile Building with old country store charm, offers unique gifts, gourmet food items, delectable wines, and picnicking in the shade.

Returning back to the Yakima Valley Highway, turn left, and back over the small irrigation canal bridge and continue on this road which parallels the Yakima Valley highway along the irrigation canal. Take the road up the hill to Windy Point Winery. This boutique winery’s tasting room reflects the Frank Lloyd Wright style, designed and built to showcase Windy Point’s breathtaking views of the Yakima Valley.  When leaving, turn right at the end of the driveway and continue along the road under the freeway.

You will pass a small park at the Sunnyside Diversion Dam where a roadside marker tells the history of the site in a small park with picnic tables, overlooking the site of an ancient Native American fishery called – Ahwahtun, “deep water”.
Continuing under the freeway proceed up the hill to Treveri Cellars Sparkling Tasting Room, whose focus is on producing a selection of sparkling wines and serving sparkling cocktails on Friday and Saturdays. Relax with panoramic views of the Yakima Valley and Mount Adams.
Upon leaving Treveri follow Thorp Road to Birchfield Road.

Birchfield Manor Country Inn is Yakima’s true country inn, featuring multi-course dinners Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings, prepared  by the well-known local chef and owner.

Continue to intersection of Hwy 24, Bale Breaker Brewing is across Hwy 24 on the right.   To return to downtown Yakima. turn right onto Highway 24. ((Bicyclists- If you have left your car at Greenway, entrance to Greenway is on the right side of the road, at the light after the bridge over the Yakima River.) Take I-82 West to Exit 33 (Yakima Avenue). This will bring you directly to Downtown Yakima to experience wine tasting, art galleries, dining choices and entertainment.                                                                                                                         Updated 2013 

The Yakima Valley blog articles feature members of the Yakima Valley Visitors and Convention Bureau. If you would like to receive information regarding membership, Click here, or to request a membership application, please contact Michelle Hopkins at (509) 575-3010.

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Bale Breaker Brewery Grand Opening

Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

Bale Breaker Brewery celebrates its Tap Room Grand Opening this weekend. This is the newest  Loftus family endeavor. In 1932, the grandparents planted the first 5 acres of hops which would become B.T. Loftus Ranches, one of the longest running and largest growers in the craft beer industry. Loftus Ranches currently grow 9 different varieties such as Fuggle, Cascade, Simcoe®, Citra®, Palisade®, and Willamette hops.  Now 3rd and 4th generation hop farmers Mike and Patrick Smith are brewing their own craft beer.
They invite you to, “come hang out in The Baling Room at Bale Breaker Brewing Company for the all-day Grand Opening party April 13. BBBC is located in the heart of our nations hop country and surrounded by a field of Cascade hops.” Field 41 Pale Ale. Topcutter IPA, and Batch 001 IPA will be flowing from 12-8pm. $6 at the door, includes a Bale Breaker pint glass and your first beer, additional beers $4. There will be authentic Mexican cuisine available for purchase from a local “Taco Truck” vendor.  Future plans include tours of the brewery and hops growing in the nearby field.

 

If you can ‘t wait until Saturday, come out on Friday April 12th to these local businesses for the Yakima Launch Party as Bale Breaker beer hits the market for the first time!  The brewery crew will be hanging out and doing giveaways at the following Yakima locations:

4 PM – Silver Creek Bar & Grill, Moxee

6 PM – Jackson’s Sports Bar, 48th & Tieton

8 PM – Sports Center, Downtown Yakima

Enjoy this Video of hop harvest in the Yakima Valley, which grows over 75% of the hops in the USA.
Hop harvest starts in late August and at that time the vine at the base of each plant is cut, then the top of the vine is cut from the 18 foot high wire, falling into the truck at an approximate pace of an acre an hour. The cut vines are brought to the processing facility and lifted onto a series of conveyor belts that separate the hop cones from the leaves and vines.
The cones contain 80 percent water and would rot or mold quickly if they were not spread across a kiln, heated with natural gas burners, and allowed to dry for 10 hours in the huge drying room. After drying, the cones contain about nine percent moisture. They are dumped onto another conveyor belt sending them to a warehouse where they are poured and compressed into 200-pound burlap bags to be ground into powder. The burlap bags are shipped to a processing plant, to be made into pellets, liquid extract, or sold to a broker, who markets the hops to breweries. The process from field to truck takes 24 hours.
Hop harvest starts in late August and at that time the vine at the base of each plant is cut, then the top of the vine is cut from the 18 foot high wire, falling into the truck at an approximate pace of an acre an hour. The cut vines are brought to the processing facility and lifted onto a series of conveyor belts that separate the hop cones from the leaves and vines.
The cones contain 80 percent water and would rot or mold quickly if they were not spread across a kiln, heated with natural gas burners, and allowed to dry for 10 hours in the huge drying room. After drying, the cones contain about nine percent moisture. They are dumped onto another conveyor belt sending them to a warehouse where they are poured and compressed into 200-pound burlap bags to be ground into powder. The burlap bags are shipped to a processing plant, to be made into pellets, liquid extract, or sold to a broker, who markets the hops to breweries. The process from field to truck takes 24 hours.

The Yakima Valley blog articles feature members of the Yakima Valley Visitors and Convention Bureau. If you would like to receive information regarding membership, Click here, or to request a membership application, please contact Michelle Hopkins at (509) 575-3010.

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Celebrate at Sneak Peek to Spring Barrel

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

The Yakima Valley Visitor Information Center (VIC) celebrates 10 years of serving visitors to the Yakima Valley in 2013. Built in 2003, with the vision to promote the Yakima Valley’s growing wine country, the Visitor Center has become the first stop for information on lodging, restaurants, activities and events.

One of the events during this year long celebration, “Sneak Peek to Spring Barrel,” will be April 11, 2013, at Le Chateau.  Wine Diva’s will be hosting this event.  Come enjoy local wine tasting, live music, Hors D’Oeuvers, Spring fashions, shopping, raffle prizes and more. This is an all lady, 21 and over event. The Visitor Center will be offering a Gift Bag valued at $25 with every ticket. The gift bag will include 4 wine tasting coupons, to be used anytime during the evening, a glass of wine, a lite-up wine glass, Washington Wine Country Coasters; It’s All about the Pretzels, Spring Barrel Wine Tasting winery information, coupons and so much more. Tickets to the event are $30. Visit the Yakima Valley’s beautiful Tuscan style Visitor Center for your tickets.

The Yakima Valley Visitor Center provides information covering the Yakima Valley, most cities in Washington State, plus Oregon, Idaho, Montana.  In 2006 the gift shop was added featuring local Yakima Valley made products and artwork, souvenirs plus specialty gift items.  In 2011 the gift shop expanded its selection of local wines for purchase and began offering wine tasting 4 premiums Yakima Valley wines with the purchase of a $5.00 Govino wine glass.

The Yakima Valley Visitor Center is located across the street from Target Store at 101 North Fair Ave. Exit 33 off I-82. (map)

Come celebrate with us.

 

The Yakima Valley blog articles feature members of the Yakima Valley Visitors and Convention Bureau. If you would like to receive information regarding membership, Click here, or to request a membership application, please contact Michelle Hopkins at (509) 575-3010.

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